Volume 1, January 2014

Scaffolding Language; Identifying Communicative Purposes: A Genre-Based Approach to Enhance Writing [3 – 9]
Ding Eng Na

Full Text | Abstract

    This paper proposes an application of a genre-based approach to the teaching of writing. The aim is primarily to illustrate that structural scaffolding leads to a greater schematic awareness of text. By understanding the structural patterns of the target genres, learners will be able to achieve their communicative purpose as they will be aware of the linguistic features of the text type. The linguistic features are associated with the ‘moves’ as a way to overcome learners’ difficulties in writing appropriately and effectively. This paper demonstrates the notion of scaffolding which is represented in the teaching learning cycle by Martin, Christie and Rothery (1987). Sixty five (65) participants took part in this study and they were divided into experimental and control groups. The two groups were required to do a pre and a post test on text sequencing of an adjustment letter and a one-shot-post evaluation on writing an adjustment letter. The control group was taught the usual lecturing style while the experimental group was taught using the genre-based approach. The learners’ texts were evaluated using theMultiple Trait Scoring Assessment by Hamp-Lyons (2003) for content, structure and language while the ‘moves’ were analysed using the moves score designed by Henry and Roseberry (1998). Results indicated that learners from the experimental group exhibited great significant gains from the pre-test to the post test in specific rhetoric moves. The results from the one-shot post-treatment evaluation on writing an adjustment letter supported the findings that learners with explicit knowledge of the genre sharpen the learners’ awareness regarding the content, organization and language use to generate the target genre. Their knowledge of the moves associated with the target genre has enhanced their skills to write better.

Beverage Learning Through Edutainment Competitions with Special Reference to Immersion Methodologypractices [10 – 18]
Ronald Willie Binati,  Souji Gopalakrishna Pillai

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    The infusion of edutainment into teaching and learning has altered considerably the instructional strategy of our educational institutions and changed the way the students learn. Beverage competition, a form of edutainment, challenges students to realize their individual potential by engaging them in a fun and self-paced learning environment. Apart from that, competition is a critical motivation component where students are constantly challenged to outpace their own performance in comparison to that of their peers. Students are shown their progress by industry proponents and areas requiring improvement are easily identified. This enables them to self-assess where they can make the most gains. Their competitive natures lead them to focus their studies in those most-critical areas. The competition allows the student to expand their basic knowledge obtained in class by their own research and development in the area that would help them win the competition. This student-centred approach empowers students to construct their own knowledge base and allows them to make a relation between their areas of study with the realities of the hospitality industry. Many studies are conducted in the areas of instructive teaching practices but no such studies have been conducted using beverage competitions as a tool for enhancing student -centred learning. The main objective of this study is to know how the beverage competition can validate the Berjaya University College of Hospitality’s (BERJAYA UCH) Immersion Methodology) IM practices. A qualitative study was carried out to find out how effective the edutainment competition could be as a part of IM.

An Assessment of Human Resource Development Climate (HRDC)- In Multispecialty Health Care Hospitals [19 -30]
D.Raja Jebasingh

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    The HRD climate of an organization plays a pivotal role in ensuring the competency, motivation and development of its employees. The term “climate” is used to designate the quality of the internal environment which conditions in turn the quality for the extent of member’s dedication to organizational purpose, and the efficiency with which that purpose becomes translated into results. Today, the total value of the sector is more than $34 billion. This translates to $ 34 per capita, or roughly 6% of GDP. By 2012, revenues are expected to reach 6.5% to 7.2% of GDP and direct and indirect employment can double. The present study assesses the Human Resource Development Climate (HRDC) in superspeciality hospitals located in Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, India were selected by using purposive sampling. The present study comprises both primary and secondary data. For the primary data well structured questionnaire developed by the researcher on the basis of 10 dimensions was prepared and used. Primary data is collected from 450 respondents like doctors (150), Nurses (150), Paramedical staff (150). The present study discovered that the HRD climate for doctors is conducive and favourable delineating the nurses and paramedical.

The Influence of Destination Image on Short-Stay Tourist’s Perception [31 – 52]
Hanafi Hamzah,   Mohamad Jindra Aris

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    Developing destination images has been one of the top priorities to increase tourist arrival in recent years in any country. The nature of tourism destination itself, which is very competitive, requires tourist destination to be developed with effective marketing plans and proper strategies. Understanding why tourists make an effort to travel and factors influencing their behavioural perception of choosing a travel destination also benefits the tourism planning and marketing. The influence of destination image on consumer behaviour has been studied by many researchers. Many of them pointed out the effects of destination image on quality perceived by tourists and on their satisfaction. This study was conducted with the purpose of studying the relationship between the image of a destination and short stay tourists’ perception and identifying which of the destination image components – cognitive, affective and conative factors has the most influence on short stay tourist perception. The exploratory study was conducted randomly in 4 destination areas in Malaysia. A self-field questionnaire was used to collect information. The findings suggest a practical means for destination marketers and developers faced with the challenge of identifying the one or few features from their diverse and multi-attributed attraction range that could be developed to differentiate these destinations in a meaningful way for short-stay tourists.

Job Satisfaction Dimensions and Organizational Commitment in Selected Budget Hotels as Correlates of Turnover Intentions: The Case of Oriental Mindoro, Philippines. [53 – 60]
Gudelia C. Saporna,    Smitha Geetha.,    Ryan A. Claveria

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    Manpower is very instrumental in the success of any service industry. However, it is quite difficult to retain people. It is now relatively common to change jobs every few years, rather than grow with one company throughout the employment life as was once commonplace. Obviously, employees have their own goals in life and they tend to leave if their needs are not met by the organization. This situation is worldwide. To address the issue, many companies outperform competition by attracting, developing and retaining people with business-acquired talent. As we all know, turnover can be a very serious problem if not dealt with properly. It is in this context that this research was conceptualized, to determine how job satisfaction dimensions and organizational commitment influence turnover intentions among rank and file employees in selected budget hotels in Oriental Mindoro, Philippines. The study made use of descriptive-correlation research design, with 85 respondents conveniently selected from 8 budget hotels in Oriental Mindoro. Result of the study shows that all job satisfaction dimensions are important to the respondents. On the other hand, job satisfaction dimensions are related to turnover intentions. Meanwhile, no relationship exists between organizational commitment and turnover intentions. v

The Process and Impact of Coastal Tourism Development: The Case of Cherating, Pahang, Malaysia. [61 – 68]
Abdul Hamid Abdullah

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    Cherating is a coastal stretch several kilometres long facing the South China Sea. Situated along the eastern coast of Pahang, Malaysia, Cherating has developed into a popular tourist destination. Cherating is one of the numerous sandy beaches of Pahang that has seen tremendous development in recent years especially in the growth of accommodation facilities. The beach is the attraction and the main trunk road from Kuantan, Pahang state capital, makes it easily accessible to foreign and domestic tourists. The early development of Cherating was rather spontaneous with the opening of the Club Med Cherating Beach facilities particularly for foreign tourists. The beach where the Club Med is located is well hidden and secluded from the public view passing through the main road, an ideal location for a Club Med. The early success of Club Med in bringing holiday makers to Cherating beach has somehow prompted others to follow suit. In the meantime, the state government of Pahang adopted a liberal policy of allowing good positive development of coastal tourism in coastal areas like Cherating. So the initial spontaneous development has been taken over by a keenly planned and localized development. Many more beach resorts have been operational to cater for the demand of incoming tourists internationally as well as domestically. Sea food restaurants and other F & B joints have also been mushrooming. The business of tourism has become apparent to the casual observers passing through or stopping for food and lodging. The government has set up a turtle sanctuary and an information centre to facilitate tourists and visitors. This study will highlight the process and the impact of coastal tourism development in Cherating.
Perception of Inbound Tourists from India about Tourism Services in Malaysia [69 – 80]
Sarat Kumar Lenka,    Sudipta Kiran Sarkar

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    Malaysia’s tourism industry has experienced phenomenal growth in the recent times and has become a significant area of its economy. One of the most dynamic inbound markets for Malaysia is India. This study with the help of descriptive analysis probes on during the visit experiences as well as post-visit experiences of Indian tourists in terms of accommodation, tourist services, facilities and amenities etc. Since the perception of tourists from the Indian subcontinent is an under-researched area, this study explores the significance of Malaysia as a tourist destination and examines the behavioural trends and the satisfaction levels of Indian tourists. The results of the study showed tourists from India are in general satisfied with the accommodation and tourist facilities as well as have a positive impression of Malaysia as a destination. The areas of most satisfaction were cleanliness and hygiene, food and beverage quality, weather and climate in Malaysia, destination information services and quality of support services like telecommunications, money exchange facilities etc. The study also revealed that Indian tourists are of the opinion that Malaysia as a destination is a perfect and safe family destination with exciting opportunities for shopping.

Marketing Malaysia as a Tourism Destination; The Influence of Marketing Mix Variables on Tourist Travel Pattern [81 – 95]
Rajesvare Rada

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    Malaysia’s tourism industry is emerging healthily over the years, with a steady growth of tourism receipts. This creates the need to study on how to further improve and develop the tourism industry in Malaysia, especially marketing Malaysia’s tourism worldwide, as the region has become more competitive with the emergence of new tourist destinations. Therefore, it is essential to study the relationship between these two aspects in Malaysian context in order to identify the effective marketing mix tools used by tourist, so that relevant marketing strategies could be implemented to encourage longer stays and repeat visitation. Hence this study is to identify the different marketing mix tools used by tourist visiting Malaysia and the relationship between marketing mix tools and tourist travel pattern. A random sampling technique has been used in this study by using questionnaires distributed to international travellers visiting Malaysia. The result of the study reveals that there is significant relationship between place, product, price and promotion and tourist length of stay and duration of stay in Malaysia. This would enable marketers to identify and implement the most strategic form of marketing Malaysia to the international tourist in order to encourage longer stays and repeat visitation to the country. The finding identifies that there are significant relationship between the marketing mix tool and the traveller’s duration of stay and intention to re-visit.

Organisational Climate and Teacher Commitment: A Brunei Perspective. [96 – 111]
Chung Jee Fenn

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    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of organisational climate and teacher commitment in Brunei Darussalam. A total of 51 secondary schools were surveyed and 340 teachers participated in this study. The Organisational Climate Index (OCI) and the Organisational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ) were used in this study. The four subtests of the OCI, collegial leadership, professional teacher behaviour, achievement press and institutional vulnerability were examined for their collective and independent relationship to teacher commitment. These four variables served as independent variables, while commitment served as the dependent variable. Commitment was measured using the 9-item version of the OCQ. The results of this study revealed that there was a relationship between organisational climate and teacher commitment. The multiple regression analysis concluded that the best predictor of teacher commitment was professional teacher behaviour. Furthermore, collegial leadership was also found to be a predictor of teacher commitment. Achievement press, though not directly related to teacher commitment, was found to be a good predictor of both professional teacher behaviour and collegial leadership. Institutional vulnerability was found to have no direct or indirect relationship to teacher commitment. This study contributed to a better understanding of the relationship between organisational climate and organisational commitment among teachers within the context of the Bruneian secondary schools. Based on these findings, several recommendations were made for future research.