Volume 8, July 2017

A Study On Factors Influencing Consumers’ Support Intention On Corporations That Practise Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR) In Klang Valley, Malaysia. [3 – 22]
Soh Yi Wan

Full Text | Abstract

    This study is based on consumers’ perspective in a developing nation context. Based on the 478 primary data collected via self-administered structured online questionnaires in Klang Valley, Malaysia, the study investigates factors influencing consumers’ support intention on corporations that are socially responsible which examines the consumers’ evaluations of the economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic (discretionary) responsibilities of the firm. The results show that there is a significant influence between the factors and consumer’s support intention towards a socially responsible organisation. Differing from Carroll’s and Visser’s pyramid of CSR, Klang Valley consumers believe that corporation’s legal and ethical responsibilities are the most important social responsibility followed by philanthropic (discretionary) responsibilities and economic responsibilities through CSR initiatives to gain consumers’ support intention. The nature of these differences is important for firms intending to embrace efficient management of social responsibility initiatives in Klang Valley, Malaysia and utilise CSR for strategic purposes.

    The Relationship Between The Personal Use Of Facebook And Hospitality Students’ Group Engagement In Malaysia. [23 – 31]
    Ronald Willie Binati,    Li Jian Yao    Chiaki Ohara

    Full Text | Abstract

      Millions of young contemporary adolescents and adults use social networking sites. However, little has been revealed about how much, why, and how the personal use of such sites relate to social media use for purposes besides belonging to Internet communities (Pempek et al., 2009). This research aims to explore whether a relationship exists between the personal use of Facebook and hospitality students’ group engagement, thus shedding light to what retains connectedness and engagement for hospitality students working in groups in the more prominent educational area of Malaysia. 300 hospitality undergraduates completed a three-section questionnaire. The results indicated that Facebook is dominantly perceived by students as a social network that is solely utilized for personal reasons albeit the fact students were found to utilize Facebook as a tool for collaborative group work purposes. Implications for further research have also been discussed in this research to stress on more in-depth exploration that is necessary to provide a more substantial scope with regards to the use of social media and the group engagement of hospitality students undertaking a broad range of university courses in hospitality field.


    An Exploratory Study Of First-Year Culinary Students’ Adjustment To University [32 – 40]
    Irene Tan Ai Lian

    Full Text | Abstract

      The purpose of this study is to identify and describe the first-year experience of culinary students at a private higher education institution in Malaysia. The research on first-year experience (FYE) of university students has evolved over the past decade in the United States, Australia and the United Kingdom. However, the FYE research among Malaysian students, especially on culinary students is scarce. Hence, it is important to investigate this phenomenon of students transitioning from the secondary school system to the university as the academic and social requirements and context of these two learning environments may differ. The lived experience of four culinary students in their first-semester of studies was qualitatively explored to determine their social and academic adjustments in the university. The themes that emerged include Approaches to Academic Adjustment, Approaches to Social Adjustment and the “moment” of transitioning as first-year university students.

    Determinant Factors Of Customer Satisfaction In Malaysia Full Service Restaurants. [41 – 50]
    Kua Soo Ting,    Liew Cheng Siang

    Full Text | Abstract

      The purpose of this study is to examine the determinant factors of customers for full service restaurants in Malaysia. Data were obtained through a self-administered questionnaire survey that distributed to undergraduate students from several colleges and universities in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Multiple regression analyses were used to analyse the relationship among variables of the conceptualized model. The findings confirmed the significant impact of all the determinant factors on customer satisfaction. The implications and suggestions for future research are also being discussed.
      First-Year Student Experience As A Learning Community In An Events Management Programme [51 – 59]
      Tung An Gie,    Irene Tan Ai Lian,    Thong Lai Kit

      Full Text | Abstract

        The purpose of this study is to explore and identify the lived experience of first-year students in an events management programme in order to construct meaning about the development of a learning community. A qualitative approach, phenomenology, was utilized to explore the essence of the students’ first-year experience. Five first-year students in the Diploma in Events Management programme were the purposeful sample. Face-to-face interviews were the primary data collection tool. The results indicate that the first-year students learned to manage the development of a learning community in the following contexts: 1) Establishing a Learning Community, 2) Building a Learning Community, and 3) Managing a Learning Community.

      An Exploratory Study On First Year Indonesian Students’ Experience In A Private Higher Education Institution In Kuala Lumpur [60 – 68]
      Ronald Willie Binati,    Irene Tan Ai Lian,    Agnieszka Mikolajczyk

      Full Text | Abstract

        This exploratory study aims to examine first year Indonesian students’ transitional experience in Malaysia in order to understand their needs as international students. The data obtained may provide institutions of higher learning with the insiders’ perspective to further design and implement programmes with the necessary support systems to facilitate their first-year in Malaysia. Using Schlossberg’s Transition Theory as a guiding interview framework, three Indonesian students were selected as the purposeful samples. The qualitative methodology was used to capture the individual and collective experience of these students. Interviews were conducted as the primary data collection technique. The thematic analysis provided three major areas that reflect their experience as first-year students and they are: 1) Transitional Issues of Indonesian Students, 2) Support Resources for Indonesian Students, and 3) Coping Mechanisms of Indonesian Students.


      The Effectiveness Of Verbal And Non-Verbal Training On First Year First Semester Students Of Diploma In Hotel Management: A Preliminary Study [69 – 78]
      Haryati Abu Husin,      Nor Hazwani Md. Din,      Yeoh Tay Boon,    Irene Tan Ai Lian

      Full Text | Abstract

        The purpose of this study is to identify the effectiveness of the a training programme on communication for first year students of Diploma in Hotel Management programme at a private higher education institution in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This preliminary training programme was designed to be an action research to provide academic support initiative for first year first semester students. Specifically, this programme addresses the potential communication skills needed by hospitality students who will undergo practical classes to be proficient in communicating with potential customers in a service setting. A total of 5 students volunteered to participant in the trainings. Pre-evaluation of the students’ communicative needs related to the practical class of the Food and Beverage Services Course was administered using a questionnaire survey. This was followed by the training on verbal and non-verbal communication. Post-evaluation feedback was obtained after the training regarding its effectiveness. The results indicate that the students performed better in the non-verbal skills than in the verbal skills. These outcomes are important especially for the institution to identify the areas of concern in food and beverage training in achieving the required practical skills in the hospitality industry.